art

Do we REALLY need corners? by artnoise

Barsch Planetarium. Photo Credit ©CC

Barsch Planetarium. Photo Credit ©CC

Think of observing around, or better, observe first and think after. The walls surround us silently and dominantly. It's all white. What if it was all black? Would you see the corners in that case?  If you don't see the corners, would you need them?

How is the space that surround us relevant for judging art? Colours are important, shapes are important, especially in a gallery or an artistic environment. But corners? What about those annoying, sharp tiny, useless stripes of hollow wall? Our full range of senses will be stuck in there, nobody will notice and, after the exhibition, we will forget them and won't be miss them.

Think of a rounded, white if you like, exhibition room. Everything would be smoothly following the flux. The context, the concept, the meaning, the visitors. No panic, no senses stuck in the corners. Fluctuant walls will be the future.

Thinking of future and past art movements, the main concept of cubism, for instance, could be turn into a kind of 'spherism' where corners will disappear and, like the planet earth on an atlas, the sphere will be spread out like an orange with all its segments.

But the future is now, in some way, and the contemporary art is still something happened in the past. Time and space are upside down in a confused, empirical and inconceivable view. The next future of art galleries will be a narrative breakup, a misbehaviour, a chaos.

Etymon #1 - Sparse by artnoise

Background image: Theo van Doesburg - Rhythmus eines russischen Tanzes - CC use

Background image: Theo van Doesburg - Rhythmus eines russischen Tanzes - CC use

Spar-SE, like its opposite den-SE, is that kind of word you can’t describe exactly. It’s a cheeky adjective, you wouldn’t use it much. You’d rather to scatter few attempts first. Scanty, sporadic, infrequent perhaps are better choices. Widely spaced, thinly distributed little (or big) objects, to give you a sense of space. A sense of isolation, loneliness for the items spotted in the great white (or black) of all that emptiness. 

That's what I call Art Inspiration by artnoise

 

It was the explosion of colours that attracted me the most, but more important it is the source of inspiration that the artist, found on Art Web by chance, had for this incredibly meaningful piece. This is ekphrasis or meta-art, as in art inspired by art. It is all it means. Nothing more. Enjoy in full.

THE BLUE GUITAR by Kip Kavallares - on ArtWeb

THE BLUE GUITAR by Kip Kavallares - on ArtWeb

Inspired by David Hockney etchings who was inspired by W. Stevens Poem who was inspired by P. Picasso’s ” The old Guitarist”

Soberness makes a woman a slave of her thoughts by artnoise

L'Absinthe, Edgar Degas,1875-76

L'Absinthe, Edgar Degas,1875-76

 "Every night I come here, in this cafe to wash away all the bastardly ways he's found to describe me as a whore. The reasons are vary and the most important one is that I'm miserably alone. The society out there is something unbearable, even if there is a growth, it seems it's going backwards in me. This bastard here doesn't even cast a glance at me. He's just cold-shouldering. Well, I must be ugly and disgusting, am I?  He must think I'm one of those ladies. Has he spoken with my husband by chance? After all, how could I blame him? The desolation is stuck in my eyes. My presence here is useless.

Don't worry, I'm fine. I'm sitting here hopelessly, helplessly, powerlessly, but I'm fine, really. Perhaps, wearing a hat in a public place, might be inappropriate and I might look in a hurry, ready to quaff and go, but I am not. I will probably stay here all night, having a lot of thoughts of my pathetic, curblike existence. Also my shadow, behind me, seems to ignore my real shape. It's not defined. Perhaps it's reflecting my non-definition, my tired body, my heavy limbs.

I am not an alcoholic, you know, but this nectar is just before my lazy eyes. I'm just staring at it. It may yet be some of use to me, it may help, at some point. The power is clear in this green liquid, although dull and turbid.

Garçon? Fill it up right to the top, s'il vous plaît."